Emilia Clarke Said She “Missing Parts” Of Her Brain After Surviving an Aneurysm

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Emilia Clarke revealed areas of her brain were missing following two aneurysms during shooting "Game of Thrones" in the year 2011 and 2013.

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Clarke said that she is amazed at her ability to live an ordinary life because of the fact that a large portion of her brain actually gone or simply not usable.

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"I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that... There's quite a bit missing!" "Clarke explained.

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"Because strokes are basically when any area of the brain isn't receiving blood for one second the brain is gone.

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So the blood discovers an alternative route to travel, but any part it's missing is gone."

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Clarke had the first of her strokes in the year 2011 after an aneurysm ruptured her brain. It also caused a subarachnoid blood clot.

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Thankfully , her friends and family members were quick to respond and she was quickly taken to surgery on her brain.

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In her essay for 2019, Clarke remembered waking up in the ICU following her first brain surgery, unable to recall her name and in a state of communication.

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She was experiencing aphasia because of the brain trauma she suffered.

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Writing, "My job -- my entire dream of what my life would be -- centered on language, on communication. Without that, I was lost."

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The following week, Clarke recovered from her Aphasia and was able back to the work of " Game of Thrones."

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After a few years she underwent another procedure to remove another aneurysm that was growing within her brain. The aneurysm was not yet bursting, however, it was nearing that point.

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After suffering two severe brain operations, Clarke created a charity named SameYou with the intention to help patients suffering from brain injuries and strokes recover throughout their lives.

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